The thinner it is, the more pressure will be concentrated on one spot, which leads to issues with circulation, nerve damage, general discomfort and bruising. Sometimes even scars, if the rope is thin enough and the pressure is applied forcefully enough. Sometimes even scars, if the rope is thin enough and the pressure is applied forcefully enough. I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons. Con: More expensive. Pro: Less expensive. Nylon is nicely smooth and comfortable as well, but it has very low tooth, so you need to use surgeon’s knots instead of square knots and any half-hitch style knot should be done three times instead of two. (If you don’t, your partner may be able to manipulate the tie and wriggle out, and rope bottoms kind of hate that. It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour. Has a really, really nice smell – sort of earthy and warm.

What type of rope should I use? When you are just starting off, just go with cheap solid-core braided cotton. I was in an experimental mood, so I bought some and took it home with me. Wasn’t terribly expensive; maybe 15 dollars for a bundle? Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. It has a sort of liveliness to it.

I strongly suspect that if you get droplets of hot wax on it, that it will cause stiff melted crackly bits in your rope, and that’s just not going to be pleasant for either the person tying or the person being tied. It’s not particularly strong with the core removed. And the answer is, inevitably (drum-roll please):. It really depends on you and who you’re tying. It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it. Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. Excellent give and flex, and there’s something truly awesome about the way it moves in your hands and when you’re wrapping it around someone. It makes the experience of tying someone a lot more fun.

It’s not dyeable; you’re stuck with the colour you buy. The combination of the lack of weight and the lack of friction means it’s going to slide a bit over skin. You can spend ages trying to unpick those things, which leads to swearing and frustration and a general lack of cool. The times when I’ve felt it most likely that I would need to use safety scissors to get someone out of rope, have all been times when I’ve been using this kind of cotton rope. I strongly suspect that if you get droplets of hot wax on it, that it will cause stiff melted crackly bits in your rope, and that’s just not going to be pleasant for either the person tying or the person being tied. It’s not particularly strong with the core removed.

That stuff is vastly overpriced for what it is. A Bunnings, Mitre 10, or other hardware store will have you covered for most things; the Internet will get the rest. Rope Bondage The Smart Way was distilled down from about six years of learning, practicing, and testing, and contains my go-to practices for my own use of rope bondage in BDSM; with both written instructions and LOTS of annotated pictures to make learning it all easy. Choosing Rope. Apparently it is often used as boat rope, so I’d say it’s fairly hardwearing and durable. Likely to get a very good life span with it. Once I finally ordered some, I had a very different experience; which just goes to show, the supplier makes a huge difference in the quality of the rope you get. Click here for a full review of the hemp rope I ordered from Twisted Monk. Small knots; sits flat over skin. It comes in a range of different colours (I like black).